Costumes from the original Broadway production of La Cage aux Folles, 1983

photos by Kenn Duncan

Alan Seeger
Most people claim he was not of the homosexual persuasion, but I don’t think most people have seen him make this face.

Alan Seeger

Most people claim he was not of the homosexual persuasion, but I don’t think most people have seen him make this face.

teldolap:

albert marquet (1875 - 1947)

Yeah, yeah, NSFW. But I love how in ye olde porn the women always kept their socks on. Was it that troublesome to ditch them? That cold?

Tonio Selwart in Tyrolean lederhosen (be still my heart)

photos by Carl Van Vechten, 1932

E.M. Forster, 1949

illustration by Paul Cadmus

backtothefiveanddime:

Nazimova in “The Red Lantern,” 1919

backtothefiveanddime:

Nazimova in “The Red Lantern,” 1919

Noël Coward, 1951

photos by Dorothy Wilding

Rosa Bonheur and friends, 1858
photo by Disdéri

Rosa Bonheur and friends, 1858

photo by Disdéri

The Three Witches from Macbeth (Elizabeth Lamb, Viscountess Melbourne; Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire; Anne Seymour Damer), 1775

painting by Daniel Gardner

Jean Marais dans Les Parents terribles, film de Jean Cocteau, 1948

Jean Marais dans Les Parents terribles, film de Jean Cocteau, 1948

thekudzuleague:

Peter Hujar’s Fran Lebowitz [at home in Morristown], 1974. Courtesy of Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art.

“‘Permanency,’ a show of recent additions to the permanent collection of the small but feisty Leslie+Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, in Soho, includes work by David Hockney, Nan Goldin, George Platt Lynes, Ray Johnson, Berenice Abbott, Robert Indiana, and Deborah Kass. It’s a fine opportunity for the museum to prove that it’s not just a trove of historic and contemporary homoerotica (though there’s plenty of that here too), but that’s not the only reason to add the exhibition to your late-summer art tour. Following the donation of 30 prints from the Peter Hujar estate, ‘Permanency’ turns out to be a terrific showcase for the photographer’s work.”

- via W Magazine

Happy Friday!

(via seven-middagh)

(via sjhinkley)

tranqualizer:

Mabel Hampton, lesbian activist and archivist

Known fondly as Miss Mabel during her later years, Mabel Hampton (1902-1989) was truly “in the life.” A major contributor of her time and personal materials to The Lesbian Herstory Archives, she witnessed and helped document gay and black life during the 20th century, from the Harlem Renaissance to her own 25-year relationship with her partner Lillian Foster.

Hailing from Winston-Salem, NC, Hampton moved to New York in the 1920s to become a dancer and singer, and found a home in the Harlem Renaissance scene alongside queer black icon Langston Hughes and bisexual blues singer Bessie Smith. She was sent to a women’s reformatory for 13 months for prostitution in the early 1920s, but spoke openly about the kindess she received from other women there: 

“[Another prisoner] says, ‘I like you,’ ‘I like you too,’ [I reply]… we went to bed and she took me in her bed and held me in her arms and I went to sleep. She put her arms around me like Ellen used to do, you know, and I went to sleep.” 

In 1932, she met Foster (right) and the two remained a couple until Foster’s death in 1978. 

Throughout the years, Hampton squirreled away hundreds of letters, photos and other items that chronicled African-American and gay life and history, including her own. She became a prolific philanthropist, volunteer and a piece of living history, appearing in the 1980s documentaries, Silent Pioneers and Before Stonewall. In one of the many oral histories she recorded before her death in 1989, Hampton mused:

“I’m glad I became [a lesbian]. I have nothing to regret. Not a thing. All these people run around going, ‘I’m not this, I’m not that.’ [Being gay] doesn’t bother me. If I had to do it over again, I’d do the same thing. I’d be a lesbian. Oh boy, I would really be one, then! I’d really be one! Oh boy!” 

(via lesbianseparatist)